Please, Cut Back on the “9s” in Pricing — They’re Demeaning!

Although we see it all year long, the proliferation of “9s” and “99s” and even “999s” in the prices of items and services will increase as we approach the Christmas, excuse me retailers, the “holiday” season.

True, this is not a recent phenomenon. The use of “9s” to imply a lower price has been around probably since humans switched from barter to coin and currency. We can be confident of this because it is unlikely that we would have seen:

“Limited offer. Replace your thatched roof for only 9.99 chickens or 14.99 bushels of apples!”

As a society, we are proud of the intellectual progress we have made. We like to believe that we are not often fooled by intentionally misleading rhetoric or half-truths , the last two presidential “blue states” notwithstanding.

Many of us are smart enough to realize that $79.99 is really $80+ after taxes and $3.299 per gallon is too close to $3.30 to make any difference at all unless one has a 10,000 gallon tank.

So, please retailers, minimize your use of “9s” in pricing. You’d be surprised at how much we will respect the $100 monthly phone/bundled internet provider as well as those pizzerias which already promote $5 personal pizzas instead of pricing them at $4.99.

An enjoyable business transaction includes respect. Pricing methods are a good way to start.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Please, Cut Back on the “9s” in Pricing — They’re Demeaning!

  1. “Many of us are smart enough to realize that $79.99 is really $80+ after taxes and $3.299 per gallon is too close to $3.30 to make any difference at all unless one has a 10,000 gallon tank.”

    That’s the one that really gets me. Why do gas stations insist on measuring their prices in an increment that doesn’t even exist in our currency?

    “You’d be surprised at how much we will respect the $100 monthly phone/bundled internet provider as well as those pizzerias which already promote $5 personal pizzas instead of pricing them at $4.99.

    “An enjoyable business transaction includes respect. Pricing methods are a good way to start.”

    Maybe that’s part of why it’s fashionable among upscale restaurants to offer prices with no decimal points—a dish will be priced as simply (e.g.) “5”, not “$4.99”. Now that you mention it, maybe I do feel more respected when they do that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s